I Can Do That



The author recreates little known incidents in the lives of famous people which caused them to rise up as champions of human justice.

 

On January 6, 2019, at the 76th Golden Globe Awards,

Glenn Close made the case for little girls:

 

“I can do that and I should be allowed to do that.”

 

Susan B. Anthony and other women are portrayed in this book. Yet, the mega-champion of women’s rights was not a woman, but a man portrayed in this book.   

 

Conversely, the ‘forefather’ of the technical revolution and mega-champion of our most basic human right was not a man, but a woman portrayed in this book.

 

Few of us recall the plight of born-out-of-wedlock children which for centuries drove immense orphan populations in the Christian world. Fewer of us can name the champion of human justice who courageously answered their call.

 

A roller-coaster ride of often hilarious and as often tragic accounts of defenders of Women, the Physically and Mentally Impaired, Blacks, Jews, Asylum Seekers, Native Americans, Asians, Illegitimate Children, Homosexuals, Transgenders, Atheists, and others wronged by society.

For example...

We all know Elizabeth Taylor's role in establishing AIDS research. Yet, despite  her public  testimony,  few of us are aware of those of her friends who deserted her because of  fear of the stigma attached to  AIDS, and of those few who courageously fought off that fear  and rose to her side... 



"Help Me!"





It was the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five.

 

An invisible stranger stalked about the underground claiming his victims, young and old, rich and poor, gay and… No, gay.

He lurked in hidden places. Hidden places, where angels feared to tread. Hidden places, where even demons feared to go.

He left his footprints in the shadows of darkened allies, under the bridge, out on the pier, in the bush, in the tub, beyond the wall, under the crystal ball.     

Those hidden places, one knocked the knocker, modeled for the peephole, listened to the rattling and the unlocking of the door. 

Those hidden places, one would step out in one’s evening attire - a stark white strip of terry cloth and clappers on the soles.

Those hidden places, one would dance and frolic into the wee hours of the night  to the deafening call of the underworld.

Those hidden places, one would pass the bottle nose to nose and forget those things that were and dream of things that would never come to be.



Desperate in Bel Air

 

The television spoke the words of an American evangelist as he stood with an American president on the world stage talking dirty:

 

“They live like that. Let them die like that.”1

 

The most beautiful woman in the world gasped. “People are dying and preachers and politicians are talking morality. What they think is morality.”

 

She hesitated, confused as to what she could do.

She had no experience in politics. But she did have a background in the world of make-believe.

She knew more about the world of make-believe than any preacher who had  ever lived. She was an actress. One who was  at the top of her game


She rang her secretary, “Get Frank on the phone.”

 

Ellen warned, “Mr. Sinatra is vacationing in the Bahamas. I don’t think he wants to be disturbed.”

 

She didn’t skip a beat, “I don’t care if he’s in China. Get him on the phone. People are dying.” 

 

Ice cubes rattled out of the glass, onto the beach, crossed the ocean, went along the way, into the city of superstars, up the driveway, and into the house of the most beautiful woman in the world. 


"You are asking too much. I'd want to help, but I wouldn’t go near that one with a ten foot…”


She hung up. She buzzed again.  Try Sammy. Being both black and Jewish, he knows how cruel prejudice can be.

Get him on the phone."

 

Ellen headed her off, “Mr. Davis is in Las Vegas. He is busy as hell.”She hung up. She buzzed again. 

 

She didn’t skip a beat, “I don’t care if he is on the pot. Get him on the phone.”

 

Ice cubes rattled out of the glass, into a land of fantasy, across the desert, into the city of superstars, up the driveway, and into the house of the most beautiful woman in the world.

 

“You are asking too much. I'd want to help, but I wouldn’t go near that one with a ten foot…”

 

Her friends were deserting her. She buzzed again.

 

Ellen saw it coming, “Mr. Donohue is on the moon,” laughing as she dialed the number...


Ice cubes rattled out of the glass, into the windy city, across the plains, over the mountains, into the city of superstars, up the driveway into the house of the most beautiful woman in the world...


continued in...



                      I Can Do That



The author recreates scores of little known events in the lives of famous people which caused them to rise up as champions of human justice.






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